Reflections on Shifting to a Flexible Classroom

Students feel empowered by having a degree of choice and control over their environment. Flexible seating arrangements allow students to choose where and with whom to work. It also allows them to change their location and location as needed.

It allows teachers to see the space through a new lens. It allows students to take center stage in classroom decisions. It makes students feel empowered and empowered in the classroom. This can help boost up the efficiency of the students in studies as well. 

Changes in the learning environment are often driven by teachers’ philosophies about how students can best learn. When I decided to remove student desks from my 7th grade English class in my final year, I was motivated after observing my students’ learning and analyzing how I could best support their learning this way.

According to the NEA article “Understanding Universal Design in the Classroom,” learning spaces are an important aspect of the overall educational experience: “Without a positive classroom climate, it is impossible to have a community of learners. Everything helps create that atmosphere, from the way they answer students’ questions to the placement of the classroom chairs.” For my students, traditional seating keeps them from using the classroom because they need it to achieve learning. I set out goals for them as modern learners.

The classroom environment should reflect what students will experience in their future careers, and most job descriptions emphasize collaboration, problem-solving, and meaning creation. Rows of standard desks discourage open communication and collaboration. Before I moved desks out of the classroom, I usually had them set up in pairs or small groups to facilitate conversation, but traditional group desks didn’t create the personalized, collaborative learning environment my students craved.

My Flexible Seat Tour

When I started exploring options for changing the classroom environment, I was careful not to try the “perfect” classroom, but to focus on the purpose of flexible seating: to give students a voice and choice in class. By incorporating different types of seating on different floors of the room, students can find workspaces that combine comfort and efficiency.

Since I wrote about changing my room a year ago, educators from across the country have asked questions about how to manage flexible seating in middle school classrooms. Middle school students are going through adolescence, which is a special challenge, and that brings a lot of change. I’ve answered questions on everything from student feedback, funding, parental concerns, and replacement plans to basic logistics and materials. There are many ways to answer these questions – at the end of the day, the classroom environment is all about the needs of the students in the room.

Although I didn’t have traditional desks in the classroom at the beginning of my senior year, I had traditional options like desks. B. Standard table with an ergonomic plastic chair. I try to meet the needs of all learners – many students prefer non-traditional seating, but equally many prefer standard study spaces.

During each assessment period last year, I conducted a student feedback survey to identify my students’ base – where they attend classes and classes every day. Home bases help eliminate distractions and confusion from transitioning between classes.

I also asked them if they wanted a traditional desk. The answer was no, and if they had any comments on furniture placement. This feedback is really helpful, especially when multiple classes use the space each day.

Throughout the school year, I made multiple classroom changes based on student suggestions, which I strongly believe were a key factor in the success of the pilot program. My classroom is truly hers, and responding to her changing needs is critical.

As summer approaches and I think about the furniture in my classroom and the new items I’ve acquired through various local funding opportunities, I plan multiple placement options for each piece.

The Benefits I See

One benefit of flexible seating that I didn’t expect is that when I moved station work and students to new seats to work with a new group, they became more willing to work with a range of peers in different locations, which seems to have been previously The case of traditional seating.

I admire the way my students take an active role in their educational process when they make such small choices about how they want to accomplish their tasks. As the NEA article states, “Students know how they learn best. Recognize the knowledge they bring to the classroom and engage them as partners in creating a positive classroom climate.”

Students are perfectly capable of stretching out on the classroom floor, sitting in Adirondack chairs, or even curling up in tire seats, doing their best. I was amazed by the discussions my students had among themselves and how easily they exchanged writing samples and ideas on literary issues with a range of colleagues.

Flexible seating isn’t just about providing a variety of different, fun seating options in the classroom. It’s about leveraging student voices, creating consent, encouraging collaborative learning, and prioritizing student needs about the environment in which they learn.

About the article

Students feel empowered by having a degree of choice and control over their environment. Flexible seating arrangements allow students to choose where and with whom to work. It also allows them to change their location and location as needed.

It allows teachers to see the space through a new lens. It allows students to take center stage in classroom decisions. It makes students feel empowered and empowered in the classroom. This can help boost up the efficiency of the students in studies as well. In this article, we discussed the benefits of keeping a flexible environment in the classroom for students. 

Bill westermen

Digital Entrepreneur, Website Builder, SEO Consultant and Professional. I have 12 years experience in Digital Marketing, And this is the future of Business

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.