How big is 40 acres of land?

My dream is to have a bunch of land in Wyoming, where I can ride a horse all over the place and still be on my own land. I’ve seen 40-acre plots of land advertised for sale, and I’m wondering if that would be the right size for me. I don’t have money to buy any land now, but I want to know for future reference so I can have some idea of how much money I’d need to save up for a down payment (that is, I want to know whether I need to save up money for more than one 40-acre plot).

Answer 1

An acre is about the same size as a football field, just imagine 40 of them. You should shoot for 20%, and can likely get away with 10% down. If you have to wait until the mortɡɑɡe crisis ends, you might be able to get away with 5% down.

Source(s): I am a Realtor

Answer 2

How Big Is 40 Acres

Answer 3

How Much Is 40 Acres

Answer 4

A 40 acre square (standard unit of measure for a typical rural land plot) is a square that is 1/4 mile on each side. So you would need 640 acres to own 1 square mile of land.

Answer 5

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RE:
How big is 40 acres of land?
My dream is to have a bunch of land in Wyoming, where I can ride a horse all over the place and still be on my own land. I’ve seen 40-acre plots of land advertised for sale, and I’m wondering if that would be the right size for me. I don’t have money to buy any land now, but I want to…

Answer 6

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I would think you would need at least 400 acres of wheat to justify the equipment. There isn’t much overlap between wheat and apples. And in apples, cider is a way to minimize losses. It’s very unusual to make money on cider, it’s a way to salvage something out of apples that aren’t good enough to make money selling fresh. I don’t know about tours, 40 acres of apples is pretty small, what are you going to offer in a tour that people would pay significant money for? Now the big thing is apples is location. You of course want to be far enough north to have sufficient cold to produce apples. And you don’t want highly fertile land for apples. Too much nitrogen makes the trees grow too much and you get into problems with things like fireblight. If you didn’t have to live, it might work, but I really kind of doubt that you can make a living off this. For instance, you are going to feed that apple orchard for a few years before it feeds you. You have to prepare it, and plant it and tend it and then you start to get some production, but it’s several years until you get good production. And I don’t know that where you are is suitable or best for wheat either. It’s actually an unusual place that you could buy land and pay for it with wheat. Mostly it would be rotational, or farmers would rent it for much less than it would cost to buy because the landlord is making their money ultimately from appreciation, not production. So first is location and land. Is the land suitable for apples and for wheat. Then it’s do you either have the cash or can you buy it for a low enough price to be able to pay for it, which is doubtful at best. Then it’s how do you make it while you wait for the apples to produce well. Typical wheat farm here is 1500 to 2000 acres, it’s a living, but not big money. Unless everything is paid off already, one really can’t live on less than 1000 acres. So I’m really doubtful that 20 or 40 would come anywhere close to being even worth bothering with. You’d almost certainly spend more than your gross income. Not to sound discouraging, but I don’t think you are anywhere close to knowing enough to have any reasonable chance at succeeding. Not at this time. Marv

Answer 7

An acre is 43,560 sf so 40 acres would be 1,742,400 sf and there 5280 feet in a mile.

Source(s): Appraiser

Answer 8

40 acres if in a perfect square would be 1,320 ft on each side

OR

there are 640 acres in a square mile, so you would have 1/16th of a square mile

Answer 9

I tell you one thing its very big.
40 acres very big plot.

Answer 10

Not toooooooo big, there are many bigger things, realise!!!

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