Educators Turn Bitmoji Build Community And Engagement

Bitmojis have taken the education world by storm. Through the Bitmoji app, these customizable mini-avatars have become substitute teachers, running virtual classrooms, enforcing rules and expectations, collecting assignments—and, we hear, making students smile. In short, they are fun.

Amber Weaver, a second-grade teacher in Louisville, Kentucky, says she loves that her Bitmoji classroom — a virtual replica of her real classroom — gives her younger students easy access to resources like the school calendar and gives them a sense of virtual familiarity, a sense of stability in difficult times.

But not everyone is a fan of the Bitmoji craze. According to an article in Education Weekly, some educators see this as a distracting fad and teachers should focus more on creating effective lessons and promoting student well-being rather than creating cute little virtual machines classrooms. They also claim that Bitmoji resources raise issues of digital equity, as not all students have easy access to the internet or use digital devices to use them. Proponents counter that effective teaching and Bitmoji are not mutually exclusive, they say they go a long way in getting students excited about virtual learning. 

Getting Started

To start creating your Bitmoji world, you need to the app (available for iPhone and Android) and create your Bitmoji by choosing physical features like hair and eye color, and clothing. After creating a character, you can use it in various activities, such as B. Reading, dancing happily, or even eating a sandwich.

Next, the Google Chrome extension, which lets you choose your favorite Bitmoji image—your avatar washing your hands or saying hello—and copy and paste it into any format, such as B. Google Slides hosting a virtual classroom.

Bitmoji classrooms

The most popular use of Bitmojis in education is to create virtual classrooms or virtual learning centers (usually hosted on Google Slides, which can be integrated with learning management systems (LMS) such as Seesaw, Google Classroom, or Schoology), where teachers publish classrooms in preparation for students materials and materials. Every teacher’s Bitmoji classroom is unique. Some teachers design them to resemble their real-life classrooms or homes, while others turn to fantasy.

 Some teachers also use Bitmoji as an entry point to introduce and discuss challenging topics. Bitmoji classes are not limited to core subjects. Educators Created Bitmoji Classrooms for Home Breaks (Grades K-3), Art Classes (Grades 1), and Maker Spaces (Grades K-6).

Setting up expectations and norms

Teachers say they find Bitmojis helpful (and fun) for a way for students to remember the rules and expectations in the virtual classroom.

Bitmoji libraries

Many educators say they use Bitmoji to create “libraries” or virtual bookshelves linked to video readers, PDFs, and digital books.

Following the murder of George Floyd, Tracey Burton worked as a pre-K-5 technology teacher in Ishpeming, Michigan, emotionally, to create a Bitmoji library with VideoLink links (YouTube links without ads) that allow books to be read aloud Different races and cultures like Mixed Me and Too Many Tamales.

Relationship-building activities

Other educators have found that Bitmojis can be useful in building relationships and deeper connections with students remotely.

Last spring, Angie Baton Ritenour, a fourth-grade teacher in Farmington, Michigan, teamed up with two classmates to create an iSpy Bitmoji space that they used during video calls to engage students in distance learning inspiration. They filled the virtual space with objects, such as photos of students and objects in the classroom. During the video call, the students took turns saying, “I’m spying with my little eye…” Their classmates had to guess which object they had chosen to help the students connect.

Galiba Džaja from West Valley, Utah, says she adds her Bitmoji to Google Forms for daily social and emotional responses with students.

Amanda Wells said she plans to have her eighth-graders complete the All About Me Bitmoji activity so she can get to know them better this fall. On the template Google Slides, students share their interest in a drawing or photo, eg. B. Draw a picture of them playing with their dog and write two complete sentences explaining why they enjoy each activity.

While some educators believe teachers should spend their time developing engaging lessons rather than creating redundant Bitmoji resources, educators have proven they can have both.

Laura Hoomes, a kindergarten teacher in Huntsville, Alabama, said she spent more time planning than ever this summer, having created more than 40 Bitmoji libraries for next year. She also created home study kits, weekly home crafts, and 22 center games — none of which are Bitmoji — for each student, giving students a range of activities to choose from.

“I have two young kids, so it’s mostly something I can do at night when I go to bed!” Holmes said. “Just trying to get ready for virtual kindergarten.”

About the article

Bitmojis have taken the education world by storm. Through the Bitmoji app, these customizable mini-avatars have become substitute teachers, running virtual classrooms, enforcing rules and expectations, collecting assignments—and, we hear, making students smile. In short, they are fun. In this article, we discussed how educators are turning to bitmoji to build community as well as grade up student engagement.

Jack Marque

Digital Marketer with over 15 years of experience. Certified Digital Marketer and Educator by Google, HubSpot, and many other companies. An ex-employee @uber and @zomato

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